The Great Migration African Americans Essay

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Harlem Renaissance: The Great Migration

Was it a positive influence because of the movements it had and the culture it has added and changed in society during that time.

The Great Migration was a major turning point America and society, including a change of culture and lifestyles. This was a contribution to the melting pot of America and combined great differences of people in a better way. Times were getting hard and people need a change. But people waited and waited change but hopes slowly we away. People of the Black Community had it the worst, between the cruel treatment they received from society and harsh working conditions, they deserved better. Many African Americans during that time made a decision that will change…show more content…

Most farmers did not like this movement. Starting in 1910, three of every four African Americans lived on farms and nine out of ten lived in the south. With this Great Migration, that number was soon going to differ. More than 1.5 Million African Americans left the south and went off to cities. This was to escape tenant farming, sharecropping and peonage. How did the people who didn’t want this movement either enjoy this or allow it. This is why I think this was a great and positive thing.
This was to not only better their lives, but to make a lasting effect for everyone to see. When they arrived at their new location, their happened to be one more issue that was the largest of them all, racism. Racism was one of the many reasons why they moved. But during that time, they couldn’t escape it. Which is a terrible thing. Society needed to change. Even finding a house was hard if whites owned the housing or if they lived near by. This was a constant struggle that they knew was not going to let them down. They were going to fight until they had the right. In the 20’s Harlem New York became the capital of Black America, attracting black intellectuals and artists from across the country to share, contribute, and express their art, music, and culture. This part was called the Harlem Renaissance.
Blacks stood together during this movement and stood up for civil rights, but they were grateful for

Harlem Renaissance: The Great Migration Essay

Harlem Renaissance: The Great Migration

Was it a positive influence because of the movements it had and the culture it has added and changed in society during that time.

The Great Migration was a major turning point America and society, including a change of culture and lifestyles. This was a contribution to the melting pot of America and combined great differences of people in a better way. Times were getting hard and people need a change. But people waited and waited change but hopes slowly we away. People of the Black Community had it the worst, between the cruel treatment they received from society and harsh working conditions, they deserved better. Many African Americans during that time made a decision that will change American and history forever.
As the History Channel Website explains, more than 6 million African Americans from the rural South moved to the cities of the North, Midwest, and West. This was called The Great Migration. The most popular city that people part of this movement moved to was Harlem, New York. During this move for great hope, people brought their families and traditions both with them. The North was a very popular area; lots of them knew they were a lot more nice and faster with adapting with change in a more modern way up north.
The Great Migration had a positive influence on the Harlem Renaissance because of the movements it had and culture it added and changed in society during that time. This movement meant no harm but just to make the world go around easier. This meant that it helped more people, and more people liked it, than didn’t. African Americans found jobs easier and more affordable housing. This was a turn for the century.
Though many liked this movement and thought it was going to help, some did not agree. Similar to like what Digital History says, the racial Composition of the Nation’s cities underwent a decisive change during and after World War I. Most farmers did not like this movement. Starting in 1910, three of every four African Americans lived on farms and nine out of ten lived in the south. With this Great Migration, that number was soon going to differ. More than 1.5 Million African Americans left the south and went off to cities. This was to escape tenant farming, sharecropping and peonage. How did the people who didn’t want this movement either enjoy this or allow it. This is why I think this was a great and positive thing.
This was to not only better their lives, but to make a lasting effect for everyone to see. When they arrived at their new location, their happened to be one more issue that was the largest of them all, racism. Racism was one of the many reasons why they moved. But during that time, they couldn’t escape it. Which is a terrible thing. Society needed to change. Even finding a house was hard if whites owned the housing or if they lived near by. This was a constant struggle that they knew was not going to let them down. They were going to fight until they had...

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